About Karl Drage

I have been passionate about aviation for as long as I can remember.  Growing up under the Runway 12 approach to RAF Alconbury at a time where the skies were brimmed full of military aircraft from dawn till dusk, it is perhaps not that surprising.

In 2004 I purchased my first DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera and discovered a way to record that passion for eternity in photographs.  From an early stage I realised that I wanted to strive for better quality and more dynamic captures, and gradually I upgraded my equipment to reflect this and started to build relationships with people inside the wire.

The following year I started travelling abroad in the pursuit of what was still a hobby, always looking for something different.  That year, I also had my first image published in print – a Tornado GR4 carrying Brimstone missiles, which appeared in Air Forces Monthly magazine.

Since then my work has appeared in a myriad of different publications, from the cover of leading industry title “Flight Global” to national newspapers like The Daily Telegraph and The Scotsman.

In 2007 I worked closely with then Wing Commander John “JS” Sullivan, Officer Commanding No.6 Squadron, Royal Air Force, on a book to mark the retirement of the Sepecat Jaguar from RAF service, titled “Big Cat Diary”.  I loved the bond that I built up with the squadron’s personnel in those few short weeks – sad times, but also brilliant times – and remain very proud of what we produced in relatively short time from it.

bigcatdiary

Two years later I launched “Global Aviation Resource” (www.globalaviationresource.com), a website dedicated to aviation news and stories from around the world, with a group of friends.  For our coverage of the drawdown of the Harrier from UK military service, GAR was presented with the highly prestigious Award for Aviation Journalism by what was then the Guild of Air Pilots and Air Navigators (GAPAN) – now The Honourable Company of Air Pilots.

I was Editor of GAR from inception until 2011 when it was suggested that the ‘digital magazine’ concept might be worthy of exploration.  With no experience of putting a magazine together, the learning curve was vast, but, with plenty of resources available on the Internet, after the first couple of issues, “Global Aviation Magazine” was soon not looking completely out of place amongst comparable – and long-established – print titles.  This was all achieved without funding and entirely on a voluntary basis.  Despite initial interest from a number of publishers, unfortunately no-one was willing to invest in it – the suggestion being that the scope was too broad – and eventually the time cost versus reward balance could not be maintained, and GAM was regrettably wrapped up in June 2014 after 24 issues had been published.

1400cover

In amongst all this, I also kept my hand in photographically, becoming an official photographer for the Al Ain Aerobatic Show in the United Arab Emirates for the past three shows, the official photographer on the Twister Duo’s tours of Bahrain (2014 & soon to be 2016), Gibraltar (2015) and China (2014), and being commissioned by DHL International Aviation Middle East, Midair Squadron and Rich Goodwin Airshows to produce PR imagery for commercial and corporate use.

Furthermore, I have supplied archive imagery to countless aircraft manufacturers and operators, including Airbus, Eurofighter, the Royal Air Force, Royal Navy, Army Air Corps, the United States Air Force, United States Navy, British Airways, Air Contractors, Everts Air and QinetiQ, as well as for a large number of books and other uses.

Today I am looking to expand my aviation client base by offering my photographic services to aircraft owners, operators and other aviation related businesses.  Whether you are looking to commission some striking imagery to illustrate a brand update, to capture the essence of an event you’re hosting or simply looking to make use of my extensive archive to freshen up a company website, please read on and see how I could help you.

Thank you for your time,

Karl